Get more Twitter followers – 5 changes you can make today

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People often think that getting more followers on Twitter is as simple as signing up for the platform and starting to tweet.

The truth is that it doesn’t matter how well you attract people to your profile via content, if you cannot convert them into followers.

Often, these creators ignore their Twitter profiles. You can think of a Twitter profile as a business card:

  • It describes what you do
  • Who you do it for
  • And points people to where they can get more

In this post, we are going to show you 5 changes to your Twitter profile you can make today to get more Twitter followers.

Let’s get started.

1. A trust-building profile picture

Trust is the main factor that determines if someone follows you or not.

People trust people.

In order to generate trust, your profile picture must showcase YOU. Specifically, your face. 

It’s understandable if this makes you uncomfortable, but if you want to get more Twitter followers, you’ll need more exposure. 

For that to work, you need to show your face.

Here’s what you should be looking for in a profile picture:

  • Choose either a head-to-shoulders or a head-to-waist photo
  • Make sure you are facing the camera
  • Make sure that you are smiling

Research shows that these traits make a great first impression. Alternatively, if you don’t want to worry too much about the background, you can always add a plain color to it.

Let’s see some real examples. Check the profile pictures of our creative investors (all accounts with over 25k followers):

There are exceptions, but for the most part, these rules apply!

2. A solid bio that gives value under 3 seconds

The next element to get more Twitter followers is to give people a reason to follow you.

When someone who doesn’t know you visits your Twitter profile, they’ll first look at your profile picture, but then they’ll read your bio.

Increasingly, our attention spans are becoming shorter and shorter. Your bio needs to grab the reader’s attention in less than three seconds.

How can we accomplish that?

Most social media bios are all about me, me, me.

In this case, we’re flipping the script. We are going to focus the Twitter bio on them, on your audience, not you.

Here’s the step-by-step:

  • Find the one thing you want people to follow you. For example: “How to grow a startup”
  • Find a few things that add proof to that: For example, “Sold my previous company for X$”
  • Optionally, add something a little bit more personal at the end. For example, “father of 2”

This would be the perfect bio for a startup founder who wants to share more insights on how to build and sell companies.

There are more structures on how to create a great Twitter bio, but this one is a great place to start.

What are the main benefits of following you? What do THEY get?

Think from the audience’s perspective and you’ll nail it.

3. A relevant header

One of the most overlooked elements of a Twitter profile is the header.

Most people choose a picture of their pet or a landscape for the header. 

If we want to make effective use of it, here are a few ideas:

  • Imagine it as a banner. You can advertise your upcoming product, or service or just add more context to what you do. A good example is Arvid:
  • In addition, you may want to include a clear Call to Action to make it easier for people to follow you. Some people do this by including an arrow pointing to the follow button. This is what Adit does:
  • It is also possible to use the same background color as your profile picture, so the look is more unified. Kyle is a good example:

As you can see, even some Twitter pros break the rules all the time, so you are free to experiment.

Be sure not to overlook your Twitter header! Using it right can lead to a competitive advantage.

4. A pinned thread that adds more context and proof to what you do

Think about what you do when you check someone’s Twitter profile.

  • You check their picture & header
  • You read the bio
  • And you scroll down to see their latest tweets

Usually, before you reach the actual feed, you see the pinned tweet.

The pinned tweet is the one tweet all potential followers are guaranteed to see. When used correctly, it can help you get more Twitter followers.

When it comes to choosing a pinned tweet, you need to take into account two things. It should either be:

  • A tweet with a high number of likes or retweets (so it serves as social proof that what you say is worth it)
  • Or a tweet where people can get to know more about you as a person
  • Or a tweet that combines both

This is an example of a good combination:

Alex talks more about him and his journey while the tweet also has a high number of likes. 

This thread might tilt the balance in his favor if you are hesitant to follow him.

It’s a pretty solid pinned tweet, but don’t worry. Both conditions don’t have to happen at the same time to make it work.

Just make sure that what you are trying to say with your other profile elements with your pinned tweet.

5. Give people a place to dig for more! The link in the profile

Last but not least, let’s talk about the link you can add to your profile. Twitter allows you to add a link to your profile, one that will stand out more. But you can also add as many links as you want as part of your bio.

You won’t get more followers based on the link. At least not directly. But it can help people learn more about you, which can later translate into more followers.

You should use it to redirect people to:

  • Your newsletter
  • Maybe a service offering
  • Your products
  • Your personal site
  • Or your other projects

However, those can be a lot of links to add. Luckily, there are solutions such as bio.link or linktree that help with that. Two examples by Alex Llull and Arvid Khal:

If you follow our steps, you’ll start getting more profile views in no time. That also means a ton of traffic and attention.

Why not redirect part of that traffic and attention towards your own projects?

How to measure if I have a high converting profile?

While making these changes highly increases the likelihood of you getting more Twitter followers, it’s not a silver bullet.

It takes some analysis and some tweaking. In our experience, the Twitter bio has the biggest impact.

You probably have a good-looking profile if you follow our advice about the profile pic and header. But if you still fail to convert into more followers, you need to experiment with your bio.

How do you know how well your profile is performing?

You need two pieces of data:

  • Your profile visits
  • How many followers you get in a certain period of time

TweetHunter gives you this data under the “My analytics” dashboard.

But you can also find it via Twitter analytics, Twitter’s own analytics dashboard.

To find out your profile conversion rate, you need to do the following: 

  • Take a look at how many new followers you got over a period of time. Let’s say a month.
  • Divide it by the number of profile visits you had during the same period.
  • Multiply that number x100.
  • The result is your conversion rate %.

Let’s see it with an example:

  • Let’s say we got 100 new followers in a month
  • My profile got 10,000 visitors that same month
  • 100 divided 10,000 gives us 0,01
  • Multiplied x 100, the result is 1

Our profile conversion rate for that month was 1%.

An ideal number should be higher than 2%, but this will typically decline as your profile grows.

Now it’s your turn

It doesn’t take more than 15 minutes to give your profile a makeover, so there are no excuses.

  • Get a good profile picture
  • Craft a compelling header using tools like Canva
  • Write a value-first Twitter bio
  • Select a worthy pinned tweet
  • Make sure you have a link ready to point people in the right direction

After this, you’ll have a killer Twitter profile. All you need to do now is to keep tweeting.

If you don’t know where to get started on getting your first 1000 followers, start here!

Looking to get more Twitter followers?

Grow your audience in 10 minutes a day.